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Neil Gorsuch, Executive Orders: Your Tuesday Evening Briefing

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Good evening. Here’s the latest.

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Al Drago/The New York Times

1. President Donald Trump announced his nominee for the Supreme Court: Neil Gorsuch, a 49-year-old conservative who resembles Antonin Scalia in both philosophy and style.

Judge Gorsuch — who was appointed to the United States Court of Appeals for the Tenth Circuit, in Denver, by President George W. Bush — is an originalist, meaning he tries to interpret the Constitution consistently with the understanding of those who drafted and adopted it. This approach leads him to generally but not uniformly conservative results.

He called Justice Scalia “a lion of the law” as he accepted the nomination.

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Gabriella Demczuk for The New York Times

2. A jarring new level of conflict has hit Washington.

Democrats skipped scheduled confirmation votes on Mr. Trump’s nominees to lead the United States Treasury and the Department of Health and Human Services. And they renewed a push to block the nominee for attorney general, Jeff Sessions. Republicans showed no sign of breaking ranks as they defended him.

The acting attorney general Mr. Trump fired on Monday, Sally Yates, refused to defend his executive order on immigration because Mr. Trump’s own words persuaded her that he was singling out Muslims.

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And a State Department dissent cable asserting that the order would not make the country safer has been signed by over 1,000 officials around the world.

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Ted S. Warren/Associated Press

3. It was the last day to sign up for health insurance through the Affordable Care Act.

Talk of repealing the law injected confusion into the last weeks of the enrollment period. In some places, people steadily signed up until the last minute. Elsewhere, people saw little point in doing so.

We asked readers to tell us how they’d be affected if the law were repealed. Here’s what they said.

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Allison Joyce/Getty Images

4. Bangladesh is moving forward with an internationally criticized plan to transfer Rohingya refugees who fled Myanmar from camps located near resorts to a largely uninhabitable island in the Bay of Bengal.

The site is hours from the mainland and submerged during the monsoon season.

The refugees said they were not consulted. One of them observed, “At the end of the day, what we want or don’t want is not going to matter to anyone.”

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Kuni Takahashi for The New York Times

5. In India, a deadly medical mystery had a surprising solution.

Researchers had suspected that heat stroke, infections or pesticides caused sporadic outbreaks of a disease that struck only children.

But a two-year medical investigation found the truth: Compounds in the tropical lychee fruit can be fatal to malnourished children.

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Ruth Fremson/The New York Times

6. Come along with us on a visit to Beaver, Alaska, a village of about 60 people near the Arctic Circle.

It’s essentially an island on a mostly empty landscape. At this time of year, the temperature can plummet to 50 degrees below zero or lower. A breath unfiltered by a face mask can freeze the lungs.

And the challenges for residents range from keeping their tiny school open to shopping for groceries by airmail.

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USA Football

7. USA Football, the national governing body for the amateur version of the game, intends to introduce a drastically altered youth football game.

The move is a response to declining participation and increasing public belief that the game is not safe for children to play. The field will be smaller and it will be less violent.

The organization’s head called it “the future of the game.”

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Karsten Moran for The New York Times

8. Home cooks are raving about the Instant Pot, a device that combines an electric pressure cooker, slow cooker, rice cooker and yogurt maker.

One of our food writers tried it out (and a similar unit from another company) and now she’s a convert. She says you can’t use it for every dish, but it’s super-convenient for soups, stews and the like.

“It’s as user-friendly as a slow cooker — except that it gets dinner on the table a day or so faster,” she wrote.

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The New York Times

9. We’ve been combing the archives of Times wedding announcements, and here’s the latest gem that turned up.

Mary Landon Baker was a fabulously wealthy heiress who left the same man at the altar three times in the 1920s. It made the papers all over the world, and she became known as the “shy bride.”

But that was a somewhat misleading nickname. She went through lovers “like General Sherman blazing a path to the sea,” and reportedly received 65 proposals, but never married.

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Damon Winter/The New York Times

10. The star of the wildly popular BBC series “Doctor Who” has announced that he is leaving the show.

Peter Capaldi, who has played the Doctor since 2013 and is the 12th star of the long-running series, said it was time “to move on to different challenges.”

The next season, which starts in April, will be his last.

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Bebeto Matthews/Associated Press

11. Finally, the 140-year-old Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show has added three new breeds to its annual event.

And cats.

The show runs on Feb. 11, 13 and 14, and it is expected to feature more than 2,800 dogs — and some special guests, like the Bengal above.

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Photographs may appear out of order for some readers. Viewing this version of the briefing should help.

Your Evening Briefing is posted at 6 p.m. Eastern.

And don’t miss Your Morning Briefing, posted weekdays at 6 a.m. Eastern, and Your Weekend Briefing, posted at 6 a.m. Sundays.

Want to look back? Here’s last night’s briefing.

What did you like? What do you want to see here? Let us know at briefing@nytimes.com.

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